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Page 2 of 224
  • Nation : Italian
  • Local Price : 19,000.00 USD
RARE SPANISH OR ITALIAN WHEEL POMMEL RAPIER C.1530. No single form or date can be given to the point at which the rapier evolved. However, accepting the common definition, this example comes very close to that point, retaining the principal attributes of the Gothic broadsword, straight cross guard and wheel pommel. Its simple counter guard is identical to one on an example in the Sir James Mann collection dated to the 1520s. Other examples with variations of the guard are dated earlier, however, they all evidently have cutting/thrusting blades. The heavy diamond section blade of this example marked VALENCIA (sic.) distinguishes it as among the very earliest swords made primarily for thrusting with in respect to then evolving sword technique. 35 3/4" length blade. Allowing for the commerce in weapons, the universal popularity of imported weapons and the blade inscription, it is reasonable to conclude that it was produced for the Spanish market and as such might be linked to the conquistadors. Of the few related examples, it appears that several are in excavated condition and nearly all in public collections.
  • Nation : British
  • Local Price : £12,995
Rare New Land pattern musket. A rare New Land pattern musket A rare New Land pattern musket 58&157; overall. 42&157; barrel with Ordnance proofs, flat New Land pattern lock with Crown GR and inspector&#acute;s mark under pan. Full length walnut stock, barrel retained with 3 slides, butt with storekeeper&#acute;s stamp for 1802, inspector&#acute;s stamp behind the tang, with regulation brass furniture comprising butt plate, trigger guard with sling swivel, &#acute;S&#acute; shaped side plate with central screw, with 3 ramrod pipes. Original rammer with swell. Circa 1802. A very rare musket in very good darkly patinated sleepy condition. Lacking its forward swivel & nose-cap, otherwise very good.   Images courtesy of West Street Antiques (http://www.antiquearmsandarmour.com/)
  • Nation : British
  • Local Price : £12,995
. A fine cased pair of Travelling Pistols by Staudenmayer. . A fine cased pair of Travelling Pistols by Staudenmayer
  • Nation : Spanish
  • Local Price : £12500
South German Or Swiss Hand And A Half Sword Circa 1560. A scarce and attractive “hand and a half” sword dating to the mid 16th century. A well made example, finely balanced in hand, well constructed and in good  condition. The distinctive hilt is similar to contemporary hilts of more common single handed swords known as “Saxon”, but most certainly made and used over a much wider region. Two similar hand and a half examples are displayed in the Doge’s Palace in Venice. These large swords were not just for two-handed use. They were designed to be used equally well with one hand by a trained user. In the 16th century these swords were probably not a rare site on European battlefields, carried by mercenaries and professional soldiers in armies fighting almost permanently during a time of shifting religious, political and social change. As fashions changed towards the beginning of the 17th century they went out of use and today are quite rare compared to the survival rates of two-handed swords which are of the “bearing sword” variety – large, well made, imposing and decorous, but designed mainly to be carried point up in civic procession rather than for use in combat. The hilt consists of a robust square section quillon block from which the broad arms of the cross guard are forged in flattened diamond section broadening towards the ends and terminating in shallow diamond profiles mounted with knops in the centre. A ring guard is forged from the block, and a smaller secondary ring guard sits beneath this attached to the base of two vertically aligned convex crescents of iron, which extend from the underside of the block either side of the ricasso. This structure is further strengthened on the reverse side by two crossed loops of rounded form which protrude from the block and attach to the base of the guard crescents below. A thumb ring is attached to the block above these loops. The pommel is of solid cone form with a slightly flared and narrow neck beneath. The waisted stepped grip is of wood covered with leather over a cord wrap. The broad blade is double edged with a ricasso extending some 5.5 inches (14 cm) from the hilt. A single broad central fuller extends down the centre of the blade 9.5 inches (24 cm) flanked by two shorter fullers of similar width which extend for the length of the ricasso. Beyond the central fuller the blade is of flattened lenticular section to its tip. Just beyond the end of the central fuller a stamped armourers mark is present both sides consisting of a face in a half moon facing to the left. This type of mark was often used by Solingen and Toledo trained smiths.  This mark particularly resembles the Toledo mark of Espadero del Rey. The blade is most likely of Northern Italian origin manufactured by a Toledo trained smith, working in an area under Spanish control, possibly Milan, from where Spanish blades could easily access the wider European sword making markets. It is also possible that the mark is of a Spanish trained smith that went on to work in one of the non-Spanish blade-making centres such as Solingen and that the sword was made in its entirety there. This sword form was not common in the Spanish armoury. Some European sword makers are known to have trained in Toledo, for example Heinrich Col who was a German from Solingen who worked in Toledo then in Germany (Cf. Seitz I, p. 344, and II, p. 268) indicating that movement of smiths between blade and sword making centres occurred. For more information on this mark see “European Makers of Edged Weapons, Their Marks – A Handbook for Museums and Collectors”, Staffan Kinman, Norrkopings Tryckeri, 2015. Blade length 39 inches (99 cm). Length overall 47.5 inches (120.5 cm).
  • Nation : -
  • Local Price : $15995 USD
Exceptional Skeleton Hilt Rapier, Probably by Gottfried Leygebe, ca. 1660  . Cast and chiseled silver hilt featuring large single side ring of ribbed diamond-section with central opposing artichoke buds. Protruding from the obverse of the quillon block are three down-turned diagonal bars ending in artichoke finials; reverse quillon block decorated with acanthus in relief. Hollow grip of intertwined rope work; pommel of artichoke form with long button. The delicate parts of the hilt are reinforced with iron bars, visible behind the slender stems. Slender 32" double-edged blade of hexagonal section with 9" central fuller, pierced with geometric designs and stamped with several small marks at the ricasso. Blade lightly pitted. Overall length 38 ½". Likely a one-of-a-kind piece, which would be proudly displayed in the finest museum collections. Gottfried Christian Leygebe (1630-1683) of Nuremberg was a highly acclaimed sculptor and metal worker. In 1645 he travelled to Nuremberg to train as an armourer with Albrecht Liechtmann. He specialized in engraving in iron, made contact with Georg Pfr
  • Nation : British
  • Local Price : £12,000
Rare Knightly sword from the Castiillion river find. rare Knightly sword from the Castiillion river find A rare Knightly sword from the Castiillion river find, 39&157; overall, Double-edged blade of triangular shape, ribbed at the centre; thin quillons slightly curved toward the blade, octagonal pommel relieved at the centre. Together with the scabbard iron chape. Very rare sword in excavated condition. Provenance: private collection from Marseille. Then Robert Brooker collection. The sword was found near Castillion. (The Battle of Castillon of 1453 was the last battle fought between the French and the English during the Hundred Years’ War). References, London Park Lane Arms fair catalogue 1993 and 2012 and R.E Oakeshott A River Find of 15th Century Swords   Images courtesy of West Street Antiques (http://www.antiquearmsandarmour.com/)
  • Nation : Spanish
  • Local Price : £11500
German / Tyrolean Hand And A Half Sword Circa 1520 With Islamic / Ottoman Inscription. A German or Tyrolean “hand and a half” size fighting sword, of attractive proportions, dating to the first part of the 16th century. A worn Islamic inscription on both sides of the blade indicates that the sword was once captured by the Ottomans as a trophy, most likely in one of the many battles engaged between European and Ottoman forces, as the Empire expanded into the Balkans, Southern Europe and the Mediterranean rim in the late 15th and  16th centuries. Until the early part of the 20th century many similar trophies were stored at the Istanbul Armoury (now the Military Museum, Asker Muzesi, at Harbiye), and relocated to other locations around the city in turbulent times for Turkey at the end of the Ottoman era, often to insecure and inappropriate storage. Some swords like this dispersed to European collections where they were cleaned and displayed. The story of the sword therefore not only represents the European armourer’s craft in the early 16th century, but also in different ways, the rise of the Ottoman Empire, which it was originally used to oppose, and its decline. The broad double-edged blade gradually tapers towards its point. A central  fuller extends from the hilt either side for 10 inches (26 cm) which is flanked by two shorter fullers 7 inches (18 cm) in length. Just after the fullers terminate the inscription is applied slightly to one side on each face and the blade is of flattened lenticular section thereafter for the rest of its length. The middle of the cross is forged as a thick, oval guard bar. The quillons are of rounded section and curve downwards to terminate in large waisted swollen knops. A sloping thumb ring is present on one side and a more imposing guard ring is fixed to the other, strengthened by secondary guard bars which join the sides of the ring with the cross bar. The outer edge of the ring is decorated with knops of similar style to the quillon terminals. The solid pommel is dome shaped on top, decorated with fern-like incised designs, cone shaped below and mounted with an integral button. The waisted stepped grip is of wood covered with leather over a cord wrap. These large swords were not just for two-handed use. They were designed to be used equally well with one hand by a trained user. In the 16th century “hand and a half” swords were probably not a rare site on European battlefields. As fashions changed towards the beginning of the 17th century they went out of use and today are quite rare compared to the survival rates of two-handed swords which are of the “bearing sword” variety – large, well made, imposing and decorous, but designed mainly to be carried point up in civic procession rather than for use in combat. Blade length 41.25 inches (105 cm). Length overall 49.5 inches (126 cm).
  • Nation : British
  • Local Price : £9,995
A Fine Pair of Holster Pistols by Griffin and Tow.. A Fine Pair of Holster Pistols by Griffin and Tow. A Fine Pair of Holster Pistols by Griffin and Tow. 15&157; overall, 9&157; round flat topped barrels with London proofs & &#acute;IG&#acute; maker&#acute;s mark and engraved &#acute;Griffin and Tow London&#acute;. The border engraved rounded lockplates signed &#acute;Griffin and Tow&#acute;. Walnut full stocks with raised carved shells around tangs. Iron furniture consisting of long spur stepped buttcaps, trigger guards with acanthus finials, flat engraved sideplates, two ramrod pipes and oval escutcheons. Horn tipped ramrods, one with worm. Circa 1770-75 Good condition, one trigger guard with added screw. Joseph Griffin was turned over to his father in 1741 and was free of the Gunmakers’ Company in 1750. He was appointed Gentleman Armourer to His Majesty’s Stables-in-Ordinary in 1760 and was elected Master of the Gunmakers’ Company in 1761 and 1763. In partnership with his father until 1770 and with John Tow, 1771-82, he died in 1784 Images courtesy of West Street Antiques (http://www.antiquearmsandarmour.com/)
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